Brexit: What might this mean for our future taxes?

22nd April 2017

As we are now potentially within 2 years of Brexit, it seems natural to speculate over what changes we should expect. As tax is a key component of our fiscal policy, to finance the public purse and influence our behaviour, various tax commentators are now dusting off their crystal balls.  Within the EU, tax has always been a reserved policy area for each individual country, so we have always been free to design our tax system as we see fit (subject to our tax system complying with the EU treaties). The most likely immediate tax impact of Brexit may be changes to VAT, where we have, hitherto, adopted the same basic VAT system as all the other EU member states. We will soon be free to amend our VAT system when we are no longer in the EU, perhaps as follows:

  • Abolition of Intrastat returns, for movement of goods to and from the UK;
  • Abolition of EC Sales Lists, for sales from the UK to the remaining EU countries;
  • Introduction of new import and export rules for supplies between the UK and the remaining EU countries;
  • Increase in duty deferment facility, to cover import VAT and possibly customs and excise duties relating to imports from EU countries;
  • The distance selling thresholds will no longer apply for small value of exports to remaining EU countries;
  • Changes to the Mini One Stop Shop – VAT will still need to be charged and accounted for in relation to affected supplies to customers in the remaining EU countries. This may mean registering for the non-Union Mini One Stop Shop scheme in a remaining EU country if HMRC is unable to continue operating a UK scheme;
  • Refunds of VAT incurred within the EU may become more difficult, having to rely upon the 13th Directive refund scheme;
  • EU VAT law and rulings of the CJEU will cease to have direct effect, with the UK law and courts becoming the ultimate;
  • In theory, VAT rates could change up or down, including items currently subject to VAT at 5% becoming zero-rated, although such changes are not currently permitted under the UK VAT Lock legislation; and
  • The tour operators’ margin scheme could be changed or abolished.


 
Other items in Business Tax
 
James Cater
28th June 2018 Understanding Tax Relief Restrictions

Although we hear of decline in the value of development land, particularly for larger developments, growing houses continues to be more attractive to many than growing crops. Onerous Section 102 levies may apply but the tax regime remains gentle. It should not however be assumed that tax reliefs will be available automatically. Legislation imposes qualifying…

Read More »

Jeannette Hume
18th June 2018 EIS Money: Beware how you spend it!

Tech companies that are financed through EIS equity cash will be aware that this ‘tax wrapper’ can be super-generous, but that many criteria have to be met to ensure eligibility. One of these long standing criteria has been that the company must use the proceeds (up to £5m pa) raised: In either a qualifying trade…

Read More »

Stephen Malkin
1st May 2018 CITB Levy: Changes in calculation basis

Builders will probably now be aware that the basis for calculating how much their annual payment is under the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) has recently changed:     Old Basis New Basis Levy on employees 0.5% 0.5% Levy on labour only sub-contractors 1.25% 0% Levy on payments to sub-contractors with Net CIS status 0%…

Read More »

Paul Tatum
27th March 2018 VAT Update – Out with the old and in with the new

  The current system for processing customs declarations for imports and exports with non-EU countries is changing. The current CHIEF system is to be replaced with the new CDS (Customs Declaration Service) to be phased in from August 2018 into early 2019.   The old system is nearly 25 years old and has become inflexible…

Read More »

Richard Alecock
23rd February 2018 Late Paid Income Tax 2016/17

  A 5% penalty will be imposed for those who have not paid their 2016/17 Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Class 4 National Insurance Contributions by Friday 2nd March. The due date for payments was 31st January 2018, however the penalty can be avoided if a time to pay arrangement is agreed in advance.…

Read More »

Vanessa Pearson
19th February 2018 IR35 Test Case: BBC presenter presented with £419k back taxes bill

  BBC Look North presenter Christa Ackroyd has lost a high profile test case with HMRC over whether or not IR35 legislation applied to her contract. The main terms of this contract, between her personal service company and the BBC, were: 7 year contract Providing tv presenting services for 225 days pa   The First…

Read More »